We’re Here for a Gourd Time

The Fall of 2014 was our inaugural pumpkin picking at the farm.  We planted dual-purpose (carving and baking) organic Howden pumpkins, which many use as Jack-O-Lanterns but can also be used for pies.  However, it’s been said that they make the best pumpkin jam.  120 pumpkin plants were planted late this Spring in hopes that there would be a pumpkin patch for families in our area.  In keeping with our start small/grow big natural farm philosophy, we felt that a 100+ pumpkin plants would allow us to gauge interest in farm activities based around the pumpkin patch, provide pumpkin picking over two weekends, and give kids and parents an opportunity to step outside of their daily routines to have some fun at our farm.

Cucurbits!

Cucurbits!

 

This year, we had a photo zone set up, a guess the weight of the pumpkin contest (won by Annie Robichaud this year), and a feeding area set up with our young pullets (laying hens).  Our feedback form allowed us to gather ideas for next year’s event.  We’ll have signage at the base of our road and parking signs as well.  Others suggested hot drinks, baby chicks, a photo of the MacCurdy Farmer with a cutout for pictures, and a hayride.  Also, given both my mother and I’s educational background, we’ll have information and activities centered around the cucurbitaceae (gourd) family.  We’re thinking along the lines of a blown up picture matching and an information sign on the life cycle of a pumpkin, .  Don’t forget, pumpkins are native to North America so it would be interesting to learn a little more about their nutritional value (organic) and how they grow.  We’ll make sure that these elements of the experience exist during next year’s pumpkin picking.  A perfect blend of education, family time, and fun on the farm.

One of our proud customers

One of our proud customers

Pumpkins retail for $3 (small – under soccer ball size) and $5 (medium and large).  At this time, we do not sell wholesale.  However, we have not ruled it out for next year as our current plan is to grow at least an acre of pumpkins.  For those of you planning on picking a pumpkin, please remember never to carry the pumpkin by its stem.  The weight of the pumpkin can cause the stem to break off, sending the pumpkin to be pureed instead of adorning your entry way.  In the spirit of making more pumpkins available to additional customers, I’ll be capping the number of pumpkins per person to no more than 3 for pumpkin picking.

Ol' Sir Howden

Ol’ Sir Howden

We are located at 29337 Route 134 Point La Nim, NB.  Look for an old barn and a green farmhouse on the south side (not the bay side) of the old road (Route 134).  The farm is situated between Methot Road on the east (Dalhousie way) and McNeish Bye Road (Dalhousie Junction way) on the west.

Guess Howdy's Weight

Guess Howdy’s Weight

Next year, we will be planting Howden, Tom Fox, and New England Pie pumpkins, which all turn orange.  We will also have white varieties like Polar Bear and Moon Shine, as well as miniature varieties like, Jack-be-little and baby bear.  Finally, for the sake of attracting customers we will also grow the Atlantic Giants and Big moose giant varieties.  It’s going to be an exciting year of pumpkin growing and picking.  Our seed will be sourced from either Veseys or Johnny’s Selected Seeds, depending on where organic seed can be sourced.  We look forward to having you to the farm next year, 2015, for a day of farm education, enjoyment, and entertainment,

White pumpkins

White pumpkins

More pictures to come for those of you who emailed or posted your Jack O’Lantern creations to the Facebook page.  The first five designs will make it onto the blog and our pumpkin picking page.

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